17 C
London
Friday, May 25, 2018
Home Arts Review

Review

Someone to Blame at the King’s Head dramatises the case of Sam Hallam, who has been in prison for seven years on the count of murder. Hallam and his lawyer, friends and family all claim that he has been...
LAUREL and Hardy. The Two Ronnies. Morecambe and Wise. Double acts are a tried and tested recipe. And, in I'll always think of you that way at the Pleasance Theatre, female duo Mackenzie and McGuire prove it's still a...
The final section of the Market Estate is being demolished later this month. 64 artists from around the world came together to celebrate its final days.
The Italian’s have given the world so many wonderful things: Prosecco, Pasta, heck even Pavarotti. But most importantly, our Euro chums have given us the gift of pizza. Back when our Roman friends created the scrummy treat, little did they know...
Rating: 5/5 The sitar is an instrument steeped in tradition. Developed as early as the 7th century, its form and playing style has hardly changed since then: 18 to 21 strings, each played in combination to create microtonal variations and...
A cardboard cutout flashes you a wonky smiles as you enter a room stuffed with bananas, bricks and bristly claw-crane hands. This is just part of the riot of colour and creation, nestled in the industrial, gotham-city-grey of Islington’s...
But at Archway Kebab House on Junction Road, the recipient of the inaugural British Kebab Awards last year, the feel is very different to what you’d expect to find at a late-night fast-food joint. This in part is down...
(Picture: Little Angel Theatre) You might have heard the story of Faust - a man who makes a pact with the devil. Well did you know The Little Angel Theatre is retelling the tale with puppets in the wake of...

Review: Micmacs

Micmacs, film, directed Jean-Pierre Jeunet.A bomb-disposal expert is blown up in the western Sahara. His widow goes mad with grief, abandoning her son to an orphanage from which he escapes in a laundry basket - only to be shot...
The books on the shelves behind the humanoid robot slowly disappear throughout the play. It is a powerful visualisation of the erasing of a life. The life is Sally’s. Our protagonist in Spillikin is a foul-mouthed older woman, played...